Why Not Doing Exercise Could Be Making You More Tiredss

When you’ve had a hard day at the office more often than not the last thing you want to do is go to the gym or crack on with your fitness routine. But did you know that avoiding your daily exercise could be adding to your fatigue?

Fatigue is a troubling phenomenon that is growing year on year. Not only can it be associated with serious illnesses and health issues, but it can also come as a result of a fast-paced lifestyle that’s heavy on work and low on exercise.

Nowadays, many of us have got into the habit of prioritising our work over our health. This leads to us working more and taking care of ourselves less, and a constant cycle of sleep-work-sleep can quickly find your energy levels dropping through the floor. This cycle can be notoriously hard to break, and you’d be forgiven for thinking that hitting the gym or doing an hour of exercise after work would only add to your feeling of lethargy. In fact, pushing yourself to work out can have the opposite effect.

Back in 2008, the University of Georgia found that people living a sedentary lifestyle could increase their energy levels by 20%. And, more recently, further Universities in America have drawn similar conclusions. Following 38 physicians during their working week, a study by the University of Florida and the University of Tennessee found that the participants found it difficult to detach themselves from their work – even in their lunch breaks. Such behaviour can lead to fatigue and burnouts and the answer, they suggest, is workers – no matter their profession – take a break each day to do physical activity.

If you’re feeling daunted by the prospect of doing regular exercise there’s an important fact to keep in mind: the University of Georgia found strenuous exercise wasn’t the way forward for reducing fatigue. In fact, the study concludes that low intensity activity is the best way to improve your energy levels. So, you don’t need to do an hour of solid, high impact cardio to see results – a leisurely stroll or half an hour of low intensity exercise on your exercise bike, treadmill, or cross trainer could do the trick.

With this in mind, why not take a walk during your lunch break each day – even if it’s just to the nearest shop and back – or invest in some ingenious office equipment that will keep you on the move?